Thai Massage Originated In Temples And Monasteries

Thai massage is an important part of traditional Thai medicine. The Thai massage was developed in the temples and monasteries of Thailand to the form of health care as we know it today. The origins of Thai massage reached Thailand, together with Buddhism. The temples and monasteries in Thailand will therefore also as the cradle of Thai massage, in the way we know it today is called. Just as Christian monasteries in Europe and the Buddhist monasteries in the institutionalization of medical healing art of great significance. [Were 1] For a long time, monks in Asia and Europe were the most important factor for maintaining written knowledge. [2] already discussed during the lifetime of Buddha the monks and used for diseases themselves.Soon they tried also to the health of the general population. [3] With regard to the knowledge of traditional Thai medicine, the Thai massage is an important component, the monasteries in Thailand and is currently seen as an important source. [4] A large number of Thai temples Thai Massage is taught and practiced today, such as in the largest and oldest monastery in Bangkok, Wat Pho (Wat Phra Chetuphon). [5] The founder of modern Thai dynasty, King Rama I, built Wat Phra Chetuphon towards the end of the 17th Century. [6] the simple people, who for financial reasons, a hospital or sanatorium can afford to serve the temple even today as the 1st point of contact for matters of health [7]. See Zysk (1998), p. 6 2. See Brun (2003), p. 116 3. See Zysk (1998), p. 41 4. See Mulholland (1979), p. 85 5. See Stürner (2001), p. 10f. 6. See Salguero (2003), p. 8 7. See Chow (2005), p. 13 Bibliography 1Brun, V. (2003): Traditional Thai Medicine. In: Selin, H. and Shapiro, H. (eds): Medicine Across Cultures. History and Practice of Medicine in Non-Western Cultures. Boston / London 2003. P. 115-132. 2. Chow, KT (2005): Thai Yoga Massage. A dynamic therapy for physical well-being and mental energy. Baden / Munich 2005. 3. Mulholland, J. (1979): Thai Traditional Medicine: Ancient Thought and Practice in a Thai Context. In: Journal of the Siam Society 2 / 1979. P. 80-115. 4. Salguero, CP (2003): A Thai Herbal. Traditional Recipes for Health and Harmony. Forres 2003rd 5. Stürner, E. (2001): Nuad. The traditional Thai massage. Munich 2001. 6. Zysk, KG (1998): Asceticism and healing in Ancient India. Medicine in the Buddhist Monastery. Indian Medical Tradition Vol 2nd 2. Delhi ed 1998th